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Integrity of minerals and vitamins in grilled/fried CSB + and ++

This question was posted the Prevention and treatment of moderate acute malnutrition forum area and has 2 replies. You can also reply via email – be sure to leave the subject unchanged.

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Sophie Whitney

Nutrition Officer / WFP

Normal user

19 Jul 2013, 05:44

Dear all,
Some recipes found on the field are involving fried or grilled CSB + or CSB ++. The idea is great, but I was wondering if these treatments would not alter the integrity of minerals and vitamins in the product. Let me know what is your experience about that, or if you know where I can find relevant documents about this topic.
Cheers!

Sophie

Merry

Friedman School of Nutr Science & Policy, Tufts Un

Normal user

19 Jul 2013, 14:09

I've just checked with the Food Aid Quality Review (Phase II) team (contact person is Liz Ignowski). They are the group that gave USAID the recommendations on their new formulations for CSB. This is their response.

"Regarding vitamin and mineral stability of CSB products based on cooking methods, they are not aware of any studies specifically on CSB+ and CSB++ in fired products.

However drawing on the data done in the early days of flour fortification (1960s - 1970s) in the US on various types of foods including fried doughnuts as well as bread, cakes cookies and noodles:

1. In the case of added minerals, namely calcium, iron and zinc, the losses ranged from 5 -10%. The losses are limited because the minerals do not degrade during the cooking process.
2. In the case of the vitamins the following losses were noted.
Vitamin A 20-30%
Thiamine 20-25%
Riboflavin 20 - 25%
Niacin 15 - 20%
Folic Acid 20 -25%

We have no information on B12, B6, B5 losses."


You can find the full report at:
http://nutrition.tufts.edu/news/food-aid-quality-report

Also, take note that CSB is designed to take minimal cooking to reduce such losses. Most cooking guidance provided to recipients of CSB don't stress this; it is considered like any other flour, so it is often cooked much longer than necessary.

Hope this helps.

Sophie Whitney

Nutrition Officer / WFP

Normal user

22 Jul 2013, 02:22

Dear Merry,
Thanks for your reply and for sharing the report, it's a great source of information!
Best,

Sophie

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