Menu ENN Search
Language: English Français

Infant and child feeding index (ICFI) for 0-59 months aged children

This question was posted the Infant and young child feeding interventions forum area and has 3 replies. You can also reply via email – be sure to leave the subject unchanged.

» Post a reply

Roman

Research Assistant

Normal user

9 Sep 2015, 05:25

In a study, we want to see the association between infant and child feeding status with malnutrition status (stunting, wasting, underweight) among 0-59 months aged children. For infant and child feeding practice we want to use Infant and child Feeding Index (ICFI) for 0-59 months aged children. But existing research shows that this index is only for 0-23 months aged children. Could we modify this index for 0-59 months aged children? How can we do this? Is there any existing article or literature for this?


Mark Myatt

Consultant Epideomiologist

Frequent user

16 Sep 2015, 10:20

Sorry for the delay in replying. I think you may have posted in the wrong forum. This is an assessment (rather than intervention issue).

The ICFI has been used in older children. The general approach is to extend the 12-24 month scoring to 36 months and to have a more adult-like diet in the 36-60 month age group. Here is an example:

This was developed using a "Delphi" approach by an INGO and hase been used on DRC and Ethiopia.

I would consider having a 12-30 month group with breastfeeding scoring +1 and have the more adult-like diet in 30-60 month age-group top reflect the marginal importance of breastfeeding in older children. I am, however, an epidemiologist not a paediatrician or nutritionist.

The ICFI as formulated in the given table has been used in studies and was associated with poor anthropometry, kwashiorkor, and pre-kwashiorkor hair and skin signs. You could test and calibrate an adapted ICFI by collecting ICFI data in (e.g.) a SMART survey and tweaking scores so that (e.g.) the scores best identify low W/A children.

A very exact formulation is not very important as you will mostly use the ICFI for population level needs assessment and for program M & E.

For needs assessment we can (with either version of the adapted ICFI) easily see what is being measured and decompose the indicator into dimensions as shown in this article to inform program activities. Ease of understanding and clear dimensionally is one (of many) advantage of the ICFI approach. For M&E we can usually ignore any small biases as these will be consistent between survey rounds.

I hope this is of some use.

Roman

Normal user

17 Sep 2015, 10:09

Its really helpful. Thanks a lot Mark Myatt.

Mark Myatt

Consultant Epideomiologist

Frequent user

18 Sep 2015, 10:06

Happy to be of use.

Back to top

» Post a reply