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Small for Gestational Age

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Nick

Normal user

14 Jan 2016, 10:51

Is there any particular study on : research or survey paper on Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR)? Especially on relationship/association with maternal nutrition.

COOPI

Nutrition adviser - COOPI

Normal user

15 Jan 2016, 19:38

Hi Nick,
there is some literature especially on the relations between micronutrient deficiencies among mothers and small for gestational age children.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15321964 (article and related references)

Nick

Normal user

16 Jan 2016, 16:39

thank a lot.

Health and Nutrition Developments Society

voluntry

Normal user

16 Jan 2016, 17:58

Post a reply: Small for Gestational Age

Sex Reprod Healthc. 2013 Oct;4(3):99-106. doi: 10.1016/j.srhc.2013.06.001. Epub 2013 Jul 4.

Somali women's use of maternity health services and the outcome of their pregnancies: a descriptive study comparing Somali immigrants with native-born Swedish women.

Råssjö EB1, Byrskog U, Samir R, Klingberg-Allvin M.


Author information
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Falun Hospital, Falun, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Sweden. Electronic address: eva-britta.rassjo@ltdalarna.se.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe how Somali immigrant women in a Swedish county use the antenatal care and health services, their reported and observed health problems and the outcome of their pregnancies.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective, case-control study, comparing data obtained from the records of antenatal and obstetric care for Somali born women with the same data for parity matched women born in Sweden giving birth between 2001 and 2009.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Utilisation of antenatal health care (timing and number of visits), pregnancy complications (severe hyperemesis, anaemia, preeclampsia), mode of birth (normal vaginal, operative vaginal, caesarean), and infant outcomes (preterm birth, birth weight, and perinatal mortality).

RESULTS:

Compared to the 523 Swedish-born women the 262 Somali women booked later and made less visits for antenatal care. They were more likely to have anaemia, severe hyperemesis and a few patients were found to have very serious health conditions. Emergency caesarean section (OR 1.90, CI 1.16-3.10), especially before start of labour (OR 4.96, CI 1.73-14.22), high perinatal mortality with seven versus one perinatal deaths and small for date infants (OR 2.95, CI 1.49-5.82) was also more prevalent.

CONCLUSION:

Pregnant Somali immigrant women still constitute a vulnerable group, which implicates that there is a missing link in the surveillance system that needs attention. There is an increased risk for intrauterine foetal death, small for date and low birth weight infants as well as serious maternal morbidity.
for more IFO go http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24041730
Abdullahi Nor

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