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Surveys in Urban areas

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Charulatha Banerjee

Terre des hommes Foundation

Normal user

1 Mar 2016, 11:43

Dear all,

Are there any examples of surveys done in peri-urban/urban areas with mixed populations of resident and migrant populations? I am looking particularly to understand how sampling was done where no household lists are available, populations are large and there is no real order to the way they are arranged.

2 specific questions

1. Maps even when available only indicate residents - not informal settlers/migrants. Expecting that health seeking behavior and health status will not be the same between residents and informal settlers how do we sample to include sufficient numbers of both groups? Or is it better to use qualitative tools post survey to capture this information?

2. Even after segmentation using maps- is there a way out of modified EPI method for household selection?

Many thanks for your responses

Kate Ogden

Normal user

2 Mar 2016, 11:12

WFP has been researching urban sampling methodology as part of the joint Global Food Security Cluster and WFP/VAM led project, Adapting to an Urban World. There are a variety of efforts ongoing in this regard, though no industry standard exists. A few examples include the use of remote sensing and satellite imagery to develop sampling frames in Mogadishu (UC Davies) [http://pages.ucsd.edu/~jdriscoll/Methods_files/J Surv Stat Methodol-2014-Driscoll-jssam_smu001.pdf]; WHO using Google earth images to develop a sampling frame in Lilongwe (WHO) [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208578/]; and the Jordan Emergency Services and Social Resilience project (JESSRP) which used population density mapping to identify dense populations and then selecting areas (GPS points) at random to allow for random sampling (REACH) [http://www.reachresourcecentre.info/system/files/resource-documents/reach_jor_report_jordan_emergency_services_and_social_resilience_project_baseline_study_may_2015.pdf].
As noted in the above examples, using up to date satellite imagery can allow for identification of recent informal settlements. If satellite imagery or other mapping techniques can be used to identify more vulnerable areas of a city (areas of focus), it may be possible to send enumeration teams to the areas to get a household count within all target neighbourhoods prior to the survey – sufficient time must be allocated for this.
Our work in this regard is continuing. Contact us via Aysha.Twose@wfp.org for any further questions.

Charulatha Banerjee

Terre des hommes Foundation

Normal user

2 Mar 2016, 15:29

Thank you Kathryn for the detailed information. Will get in touch shortly on the address mentioned.

Caroline Wilkinson

Senior Nutrition Officer / UNHCR

Normal user

2 Mar 2016, 16:40

Hello Charulatha,

This is a particular challenge!

I'm not sure exactly what type of survey you are looking to implement in an urban environment but in response to this particular problem of measuring malnutrition among refugee populations in out-of camp situations (including Urban situations), UNHCR developed an addendum to the SENS methodology (UNHCR STANDARDISED EXPANDED NUTRITION SURVEY (SENS) GUIDELINES FOR REFUGEE POPULATIONS ADDENDUM FOR OUT-OF-CAMP SETTINGS http://sens.unhcr.org/introduction/out-of-camp-sens/)

The addendum suggests and proposes a variety of different methodologies depending on the context. Hope that you find it helpful.

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