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Accessing coverage of OTPs

This question was posted the Coverage assessment forum area and has 4 replies. You can also reply via email – be sure to leave the subject unchanged.

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Florence

Normal user

5 Dec 2011, 17:42

I would like to assess coverage of 8 OTCs located in different districts but i dont have a big budget for this. The 8 OTCs are located within the health facilities supported by the Ministry of Health.

SMART survey data is not available for all of them but the admissions are low and default rates are high.

Do we have simple and rapid methods which I can use at minimal cost.

Please advice

Mark Myatt

Consultant Epideomiologist

Frequent user

5 Dec 2011, 18:26

I think that you have two options ...

(1) Do the first stage of a SQUEAC investigation. This will give you a good idea of what is good and bad about your program, why defaulters are defaulting, &c. A lot of this can be done using routine monitoring data, examination of patient records, and some interviews with carers and other informants. You won't get a coverage figure but you will get information to help you improve the program and make a decent guess about what coverage might be. You could do this in a few days.

(2) Use SLEAC. This is a rapid survey method using a small sample size (e.g. n = 40 or smaller) that can classify coverage as (e.g.) poor, moderate, or good (using whatever thresholds you want to define these classes) in individual districts or clinic catchment areas. If the populations are small then the sample sizes may be reduced to (e.g.) n = 30. SLEAC surveys can be combined to produce a wide-area estimate. A single SLEAC survey might take 3 or 4 days.

You could do both ... use SLEAC to identify the best (or the worst) and then use some of the SQUEAC tools to investigate the best (or the worst) programs.

In your situation (i.e. you have strong suspicions that coverage is low) and I were really pushed for money I would do (1) and use the information provided to inform program reforms (i.e. identify and fix the problems identified) before spending time and money surveying to get an answer that you already suspect. I would do (1) a few times (three months apart) perhaps extending the work to include some SQUEAC small area surveys or SQUEAC small studies before surveying with SLEAC or doing a full SQUEAC survey.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you need more information.

Mark Myatt

Consultant Epideomiologist

Frequent user

6 Dec 2011, 11:45

This is just to let you know that you can see / download the latest draft of the SQUEAC and SLEAC handbook here. The material available here will form the basis of a handbook to be published by FANTA in early 2012.

Florence

Normal user

6 Dec 2011, 17:11

Thanks Mark for guidance and the reference materials.

I will read through and consult further if i get stuck. Thanks

Mark Myatt

Consultant Epideomiologist

Frequent user

6 Dec 2011, 17:16

Happy to help. Please post any questions to this forum.

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